Hashtag For Mac Keyboard

Hashtag For Mac Keyboard

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To do a hashtag on a UK Mac, press Alt + 3. It's as simple as that. If you're using a US Mac keyboard, meanwhile, things are easier: it's the secondary option for the 3 key (you'll see a # above. This article has been adapted from 'On Currency Symbols and Musical Notation' and 'The Hash key in Aquamacs' from the old AstroWiki. My thanks to Ryan.

This term collection covers how to refer to keyboard shortcuts and the names of specific keys.

For information about describing customers' interactions with UI, see Procedures and instructions.

Keyboard actions and access

TermUsage
keyboard shortcut, accelerator key, fast key, hot key, quick key, speed keyIn general, use keyboard shortcut to describe a combination of keystrokes used to perform a task.
Example
Alt+Ctrl+S
Don't use accelerator key, fast key, hot key, quick key, or speed key.
access keyDon't use in content for a general audience. Use keyboard shortcut instead.
In content for developers or content about customizing the UI, it's OK to distinguish between an access key and a shortcut key. An access key is a letter or number that users select to access UI controls that have text labels. For example, the F in Alt+F. A shortcut key is a key or key combination that users select to perform a common action. For example, Ctrl+V. If you use these terms, explain the difference.
Key TipIn general, don't use in content for a general audience. Use keyboard shortcut instead.
In content teaching basic skills or content for a technical audience, it's OK to use Key Tip to refer to the letter or number that appears in the ribbon when the Alt key is pressed.
key combinationDon't use in content for a general audience. Use keyboard shortcut instead.
In content for a technical audience, it's OK to distinguish between a key combination (two or more keys selected simultaneously) and a key sequence (two or more keys selected sequentially). If you use these terms, explain the difference.
key sequenceDon't use in content for a general audience. Use keyboard shortcut instead.
In content for a technical audience, it's OK to distinguish between a key sequence (two or more keys selected sequentially) and a key combination (two or more keys selected simultaneously). If you use these terms, explain the difference.
keypadUse numeric keypad on the first mention. Don't use keypad by itself unless the context has been established and there's no possibility the customer will confuse the keypad with the keyboard. When in doubt, continue to use numeric keypad.
In general, don't distinguish between the keyboard and the numeric keypad. When the customer can select two keys that look the same, direct the customer to the correct key.
Example
Select the Minus sign on the numeric keypad, not the Hyphen key on the keyboard.
keystroke, keypressDon't use keypress. Use keystroke instead.
select, press, depress, hit, strike, useUse select to describe pressing a key on a physical or on-screen keyboard. Don't use press, depress, hit, or strike.
Don't use depressed to describe an indented toolbar button unless you have no other choice.
Use use when select might be confusing, such as when referring to the arrow keys or function keys and select might make customers think that they need to select all the arrow keys simultaneously.
Example
Use the arrow keys to move around the text.
Use use when multiple platform or peripheral choices initiate the same action or actions within a program.
Example
Use the controls on your keyboard or controller to run through the obstacle course.
Be specific when teaching beginning skills.
Example
To run through the obstacle course, select the Spacebar on the keyboard or pull the right trigger on the Xbox controller.
Consider using a table to present instructions that have more than two alternatives.
Use select and hold only if a delay is built into the software or hardware interaction. Don't use select and hold when referring to a mouse button unless you're teaching beginning skills.
See alsoDescribing interactions with UI, Mouse and mouse interaction term collection
shortcut keyDon't use in content for a general audience. Use keyboard shortcut instead.
In content for developers or content about customizing the UI, it's OK to distinguish between an access key and a shortcut key. An access key is a letter or number that users select to access UI controls that have text labels. For example, the F in Alt+F. A shortcut key is a key or key combination that users select to perform a common action. For example, Ctrl+V. If you use these terms, explain the difference.

Key names

  • In general, use sentence capitalization for key names.
    Examples
    the Shift key
    the Page up key

  • Capitalize letter keys in general references.
    Example
    the K key

  • Lowercase and bold a letter key when instructing customers to enter the letter (unless you're instructing them to enter a capital letter).
    Example
    enter k

  • On the first mention, you can use the definite article the and the word key with the key name if necessary for clarity.
    Example
    Select the F1 key.

  • On subsequent mentions, refer to the key by its name only.
    Example
    Select F1.

Ifyou need guidance for a key name that isn't on this list, use sentencecapitalization and spell it as it appears on the keyboard.

TermUsage
AltCapitalize. Use to refer to the Alt key.
Application keyCapitalize. Use the Application key to refer to the key that opens a shortcut menu containing commands related to a selection.
arrow keys, direction keys, directional keys, movement keysArrow keys are labeled only with an arrow. Refer to similar keys on the numeric keypad as the arrow keys on the numeric keypad.
Use sentence capitalization to refer to a specific arrow key: the Left arrow key, the Right arrow key, the Up arrow key, or the Down arrow key. It’s OK to use arrow key as a general term for any single arrow key. Include the and key in references to a specific arrow key except in key combinations or key sequences.
Don’t use direction keys, directional keys, or movement keys.
Use specific names to refer to other navigational keys, such as Page up, Page down, Home, and End.
asterisk (*), starUse asterisk to refer to the * symbol.
An asterisk is used to indicate multiplication in a programming language or as a wildcard character representing one or more characters.
It’s OK to use star to refer to the key on a phone keypad.
at sign (@)Pronounced at. In most cases, don’t spell out.
BackCapitalize. Use to refer to the Back key, which performs the same action as the Back button in a browser.
BackspaceCapitalize. Use to refer to the Backspace key.
backtabDon’t use to refer to the Shift+Tab keyboard shortcut.
Break capsUse sentence capitalization. Use to refer to the Break caps key.
Caps lockUse sentence capitalization. Use to refer to the Caps lock key.
comma (,)Spell out comma when referring to a key or the punctuation mark.
Capitalize Comma when instructing a reader to select the key. Include the symbol in parentheses when needed for clarity.
CommandCapitalize. Use to refer to the Command key on the Mac keyboard. Use the bitmap to show this key if possible. It isn't named on the keyboard.
ControlCapitalize. Use to refer to the Control key on the Mac keyboard.
CtrlCapitalize. Use to refer to the Ctrl key. Don’t use for the Mac keyboard.
DelCapitalize. Use to refer to the Del key. On the Mac keyboard only, use to refer to the forward delete key.
DeleteCapitalize. Use to refer to the back delete key on the Mac keyboard.
EndCapitalize. Use to refer to the End key.
EnterCapitalize. Use to refer to the Enter key. On the Mac, use only when functionality requires it.
EscAlways use Esc, not Escape.
F1–F12Capitalize the F. Don't add a space between the F and the number.
ForwardCapitalize. Use to refer to the Forward key, which performs the same action as the Forward button in a browser.
HelpUse the Help key only to refer to the key on the Mac keyboard.
HELP keyUse the HELP key to avoid confusion with the Help button. Always include the and key.
HomeCapitalize. Use to refer to the Home key.
hyphen (-)Spell out hyphen when referring to a key. Capitalize Hyphen when instructing a reader to select the key. Include the symbol in parentheses when needed for clarity.
InsertCapitalize. Use to refer to the Insert key.
Lock clearCapitalize. Use to refer to the Lock clear key.
minus sign (–)Spell out minus sign when referring to a key. Use sentence capitalization (Minus sign) when instructing a reader to select the key. Include the symbol in parentheses when needed for clarity.
Num lock optionUse sentence capitalization. Use to refer to the Num lock option key on the Mac keyboard.
number sign (#), pound key, hashtagUse # key to describe the key.
It's OK to use pound key (#), including the symbol in parentheses, to refer to the keypad on a telephone. It's OK to use hashtag (#) to describe the use of the # key to identify a metadata term in social media.
numeric keypad, keypad, numerical keypad, numeric keyboardUse numeric keypad on first mention. Don't use keypad by itself unless there's no possibility of confusion with the keyboard. Don't use numerical keypad or numeric keyboard.
In general, don't distinguish between the keyboard and the numeric keypad. If a customer can select two keys that look the same, specify the correct key.
Example
Select the Minus sign on the numeric keypad.
on-screen keyboard, keyboard display, soft keyboard, virtual keyboard, visual keyboardUse to describe the keyboard representation on the screen that the customer touches to enter characters.
Hyphenate on-screen keyboard. Don't use virtual keyboard, soft keyboard, visual keyboard, or keyboard display.
Page down, Page upUse sentence capitalization. Use to refer to the Page up key and the Page down key.
PauseCapitalize. Use to refer to the Pause key.
period (.)Spell out period when referring to a key. Capitalize Period when instructing a reader to select the key. Include the symbol in parentheses when needed for clarity.
plus sign (+)Spell out plus sign when referring to a key. Use sentence capitalization (Plus sign) when instructing a reader to select the key. Include the symbol in parentheses when needed for clarity.
Print screenUse sentence capitalization. Use to refer to the Print screen key.
ResetCapitalize. Use to refer to the Reset key.
ReturnCapitalize. Use to refer to the Return key on the Mac keyboard.
Scroll lockUse sentence capitalization. Use to refer to the Scroll lock key.
SelectCapitalize. Use to refer to the Select key.
ShiftCapitalize. Use to refer to the Shift key.
SpacebarCapitalize. Use to refer to the Spacebar. Always precede with the except in procedures, key combinations, and key sequences.
TabCapitalize. Use to refer to the Tab key. Always use the and key except in key combinations and key sequences.
Windows logo keyCapitalize Windows. Use to refer to the Windows logo key.
Hashtags

Special character names

Becausespecial character names could be confused with an action (such as+) or be difficult to see, always spell out the following specialcharacter names: Plus sign, Minus sign, Hyphen, Period, and Comma.

To avoid confusion, it's OK to add the character in parentheses after spelling out the name.
Example
Plus sign (+)

Use discretion. This might not be necessary for commonly used characters, such as the period (.).

To show a key combination that includes punctuation requiring use of the Shift key, such as the question mark, use Shift and the name or symbol of the shifted key. Using the name of the unshifted key, such as 4 rather than $, could be confusing or even wrong. For example, the ? and / characters aren't shifted keys on every keyboard. Always spell out Plus sign, Minus sign, Hyphen, Period, and Comma.

Examples
Ctrl+Shift+?
Ctrl+Shift+*
Ctrl+Shift+Comma

See alsoSpecial character term collection

Mapping Windows keys to Apple keyboards

Many of the keys that you'd see on a PC have equivalent keys on an Apple keyboard:

Windows logo: press Command (⌘)

Backspace or Delete: press Delete

Enter or ⏎: press Return

Mac

Alt (left): press Option

Dolphin emulator on mac os sierra vista. Alt GR (right): press Option + Control

Applications: This key isn't available on Apple keyboards

Using the Windows On-Screen Keyboard for other functions

If your keyboard doesn't include these keys, you can recreate them using the On-Screen Keyboard as described in this Microsoft support article.

  • Pause/Break
  • Insert
  • Forward Delete
  • Home
  • End
  • Page Up
  • Page Down
  • Number Lock
  • Scroll Lock

Printing from the screen

To recreate the Print Screen and Print Active Window function in Windows, use the Snipping Tool as described in this Microsoft support article.

Numeric keypad mappings

Use the standard numerical keys beneath the Function keys for numerical entry on the Apple Wireless Keyboard. Apple external keyboards with built-in numeric keypads provide the same function as Microsoft-compatible numeric keypads.

If your keyboard isn't working

Boot Camp installs Windows support software (drivers) that let you use features of Apple keyboards in Windows. If your keyboard works when your Mac is started in macOS but not Windows, try reinstalling Windows support software from Boot Camp Assistant.

Learn more

Use Microsoft Keyboard Layout Creator to find the key combinations for unique characters in the language and region your Apple keyboard is designed to support:

  1. Download, install and open the Microsoft Keyboard Layout Creator.
  2. Choose File > Load Existing Keyboard.
  3. Select the keyboard you want to see.
  4. Find the country or region name in the keyboard list that's followed by '(Apple)'.
  5. Follow the instructions provided with the app. You can print images of the keyboard, including what keys look like when holding modifiers like Shift, Option or Fn.

Microsoft provides a keyboard mapping article that describes using a Windows keyboard with macOS.

Apple does not provide technical phone support for installing, using or recovering Microsoft Windows. Support is available for using Boot Camp Setup Assistant, as well as installing or restoring Boot Camp software while your Mac is started from Windows. Support articles and discussions might also be available on Apple's support website.

Hashtag For Mac Keyboard
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